Author(s)

Kristien Meuris, Bea Maes, and Inge Zink

Year

2015

Publication

American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology

The main goal of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a Key Word Signing (KWS) immersion program in a residential and day care facility for adults with mild to severe ID. The purpose of this program was for adults with ID to learn to use KWS in functional communication through their support staff. We hypothesized that, after implementation of the KWS program, the following things would occur:
Participating support workers would significantly increase their manual sign production (more sign utterances, more signs, and more different signs) and would significantly simplify their verbal language production (fewer verbal utterances, fewer words, and fewer different words).

Participating adults with ID would significantly increase their manual sign production (more sign utterances, more signs, and more different signs) and their verbal language production (more verbal utterances, more words, and more different words).

Participating adults with ID would use KWS to express a larger variety of communicative functions. This larger variety would be measurable both within the KWS measures (larger variety posttest compared with pretest) and when comparing the verbal language and the KWS production (larger variety when KWS is used compared with when only verbal language is used).

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